Tokyo Electric Power Co.

Industry/Regulatory/Political

  • The Japanese government has announced a plan to rebuild some areas in the Fukushima Daiichi evacuation zone, enabling residents in those areas to return in two years once power, water and sewage services are restored. Returning residents will be offered work in decontaminating the area and decommissioning the damaged plant. The ten-year “grand plan,” unveiled last week by the reconstruction minister, also calls for restoring the area’s transportation infrastructure within five years and attracting young people by developing new industrial, research and educational infrastructure, including renewable energy.
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Plant Update

  • Tokyo Electric Power Co. said it found no significant damage or deformation to two unused fuel assemblies it had removed last week from the used fuel storage pool of Fukushima Daiichi reactor 4. The utility said it also will examine fuel pellets from inside the assembly rods. The relatively large amount of fuel in the reactor 4 storage pool (1,331 used nuclear fuel and 202 unused nuclear fuel assemblies) has made their removal one of TEPCO’s top priorities for decommissioning the site. The company plans to begin removing the fuel assemblies starting December 2013.
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Plant Update

  • Tokyo Electric Power Co. has removed the primary containment vessel dome from Fukushima Daiichi reactor 4. TEPCO published photos and video clips showing the dome being lowered to the ground. The dome will be cut up and stored on site. The company also is preparing to remove the reactor pressure vessel head in October. Steve Kraft, NEI’s senior director for Fukushima response, said these actions are key steps to prepare for the installation of a structure over the building that will allow fuel to be removed from the reactor’s used fuel storage pool. Last week TEPCO also attempted to use a camera-equipped balloon probe to investigate the condition of reactor 1’s refueling floor. The initial attempt was unsuccessful, and the company said it will try again.
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Industry/Regulatory/Political

  • An independent review of lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi and Daini nuclear plants in the aftermath of last year’s earthquake and tsunami, conducted by the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations at the request of Tokyo Electric Power Co., says that reactor operators should allocate resources and training to prepare for unexpected circumstances. Priorities identified include maintaining reactor cooling and multi-unit emergency response capabilities and continually strengthening nuclear safety cultures. Tony Pietrangelo, NEI’s senior vice president and chief nuclear officer, said, “For the U.S. nuclear industry, our first priority is and always will be safety. INPO’s findings are aligned with steps already being taken to enhance safety across our industry.”
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PSEG Nuclear's Jamie Mallon examines a back-up generator, one of several back-up systems that keep a plant running safely during an extended loss of power.

PSEG Nuclear's Fukushima Response Manager Jamie Mallon examines a back-up generator. (Click to enlarge.)

Top safety experts at all U.S.nuclear energy facilities are implementing FLEX, a strategy developed to address the main safety challenges at Fukushima, and planning for events that are more severe than those for which their facilities were designed. PSEG Nuclear’s Jamie Mallon is one such expert. With more than 30 years of experience in radiation protection, regulatory assurance, training and nuclear development programs, Mallon is helping to lead the industry’s Fukushima response effort, while balancing his roles as PSEG’s early site permit manager and Fukushima response manager. 

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Activity ID: 1002943 Activity Name: NEI Remarketing Safety Activity Group Name: Remarketing Safety First