Nuclear Energy Overview

The following story originally appeared in NEI’s Nuclear Energy Overview.

In ongoing discussions with the NRC on the industry’s response to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident, NEI staff has stressed the need to consider a phased approach to regaining access to a nuclear facility site during an emergency caused by severe natural events.

In a draft letter requesting information on industry’s post-Fukushima emergency preparedness, NRC staff has asked the industry to provide information on its ability to implement an emergency plan in response to a hypothetical large-scale natural event that would result in:

  • all reactors at the facility site being affected
  • an extended loss of off-site power
  • impeded access to the reactor site.
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The following story originally appeared in NEI’s Nuclear Energy Overview.

NEI President and CEO Marvin Fertel laid out the nuclear energy industry’s agenda for 2012 today in a briefing in New York City for Wall Street financial analysts.

“Safe operation of our plants is—and will always be—our top priority,” Fertel said. “It’s our responsibility to our employees, neighbors and all other stakeholders. It’s also good business.”
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The following story originally appeared in NEI’s Nuclear Energy Overview.

Severe accidents at nuclear energy facilities would unfold more slowly and potential releases of radioactive material would be much smaller than earlier studies indicated, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission concludes in a new report.

The report also says that existing safety measures—including those put in place after 9/11—would be highly effective in protecting the public. Moreover, the NRC says, even if mitigating measures fail or are not used, “the analyzed accidents would cause essentially zero immediate deaths and only a very, very small increase in the long-term cancer deaths.”
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The following story originally appeared in NEI’s Nuclear Energy Overview.

A new study will help operating U.S. nuclear facilities in the central and eastern United States reassess their seismic risks as part of efforts to implement lessons learned from the events at Fukushima Daiichi. A revised seismic model resulting from the study will also be used by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to license new nuclear facilities.

The seismic source model emerged from a four-year study conducted by the Electric Power Research Institute, the Energy Department and the NRC. It replaces models in use since the late 1980s and will help operators of nuclear energy facilities determine how they can better prepare for extreme events that might occur about once in 10,000 years.
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The following story originally appeared in NEI’s Nuclear Energy Overview.

There is an emerging consensus among U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff, the agency’s advisory committee, industry and key committees in Congress that an “all-hazards” approach offers the most promise for enhancing safety of nuclear energy facilities in a post-Fukushima, post 9/11 world and for expanding safety margin quickly. While the various parties to these discussions differ on certain technical aspects, and many details remain to be fleshed out, the apparent alignment at a conceptual level is a promising development as the post-Fukushima work moves forward on the commission’s aggressive schedule.

At a public meeting today of the NRC and industry steering committees on post-Fukushima actions, NEI Senior Vice President and Chief Nuclear Officer Anthony Pietrangelo sought to clarify how the intent of the industry’s diverse and flexible coping capability, or FLEX, differs from the goal of such frameworks as severe accident management guidelines (SAMGs). “The purpose of establishing diverse, flexible coping capabilities is to prevent fuel damage, whereas SAMGs come into play after core damage,” Pietrangelo said.

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Activity ID: 1002943 Activity Name: NEI Remarketing Safety Activity Group Name: Remarketing Safety First