Japan Nuclear

Industry/Regulatory/Political

  • The Japanese government has announced a plan to rebuild some areas in the Fukushima Daiichi evacuation zone, enabling residents in those areas to return in two years once power, water and sewage services are restored. Returning residents will be offered work in decontaminating the area and decommissioning the damaged plant. The ten-year “grand plan,” unveiled last week by the reconstruction minister, also calls for restoring the area’s transportation infrastructure within five years and attracting young people by developing new industrial, research and educational infrastructure, including renewable energy.
    Read More »

Plant Update

  • Tokyo Electric Power Co. said it found no significant damage or deformation to two unused fuel assemblies it had removed last week from the used fuel storage pool of Fukushima Daiichi reactor 4. The utility said it also will examine fuel pellets from inside the assembly rods. The relatively large amount of fuel in the reactor 4 storage pool (1,331 used nuclear fuel and 202 unused nuclear fuel assemblies) has made their removal one of TEPCO’s top priorities for decommissioning the site. The company plans to begin removing the fuel assemblies starting December 2013.
    Read More »

Industry/Regulatory/Political

  • The International Atomic Energy Agency’s Annual Report for 2011 notes that while the Fukushima Daiichi accident slowed the growth of nuclear energy, it did not reverse it. The IAEA projects at least 90 new reactors to be in operation globally by 2030, a 7 to 8 percent reduction from its pre-accident estimate. Of the 64 reactors under construction at the end of 2011, 26 are in China, 10 in Russia, six in India and five in South Korea, the report said. Asia is expected to continue as the center of new growth, with new reactor projects in the United Arab Emirates, Turkey, Vietnam and Bangladesh. The report is to be presented at the IAEA’s annual General Conference in Vienna next month.
    Read More »

Industry/Regulatory/Political

  • The International Atomic Energy Agency is leading a “seismic study mission” to collect data about the effects of the 2011 earthquake on Japan’s Onagawa Nuclear Power Station. IAEA said the mission will include regulators from different countries and other experts. The goal of the trip is to collect information that member nations can use as they develop their own earthquake preparedness and response plans.
    Read More »

The following news article originally appeared in NEI’s Nuclear Energy Overview.

A new Japanese government investigation of the Fukushima accident says that national and local organizations were ill-prepared for a large-scale and complex natural disaster such as last year’s earthquake and tsunami, leading to more severe accident consequences than would otherwise have been the case.

The study was commissioned in May 2011 by the cabinet and is the latest of several investigations into the accident that have been conducted in Japan by, among others, Fukushima operator Tokyo Electric Power Co., the country’s parliament and its nuclear regulator.
Read More »

Activity ID: 1002943 Activity Name: NEI Remarketing Safety Activity Group Name: Remarketing Safety First