Hurricane

The following news article originally appeared in NEI’s Nuclear Energy Overview.

The nuclear energy industry is “safer than it was before the Fukushima Daiichi accident” as nuclear energy facility operators around the world continue to upgrade their emergency preparedness and response capabilities, the International Atomic Energy Agency said in its annual report to the United Nations General Assembly.
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Industry/Regulatory/Political

  • Japan’s Nuclear Regulation Authority is investigating whether Kansai Electric Power’s Ohi nuclear plant—the only operating facility in the country—is on an active fault line. The NRA heard last week from a group of experts who have surveyed the fissure. The agency has yet to decide whether the fissure in a 125,000-year-old rock stratum came from seismic activity or if it was caused by a landslide. The Japanese government bans nuclear plant operators from building facilities directly above active fault lines. The NRA said if the Ohi fissure is confirmed to be an active fault, it will halt the plant’s operations.
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The following news article originally appeared in NEI’s Nuclear Energy Overview.

Of the 34 nuclear energy facilities in the path of Hurricane Sandy, all responded well and safely to the powerful storm, demonstrating their resilience against severe natural forces.

Careful planning and comprehensive preparations days in advance of the storm paid off at all the facilities, ensuring they were prepared to take the steps necessary to maintain safety against Sandy’s high winds, record flooding and disturbances on the regional electric grid. Highly trained reactor operators and emergency response personnel stationed at the plants throughout the storm took actions beyond their usual duties to protect the power plants and communities that surround them. Additional inspectors from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission were stationed at each nuclear energy facility to oversee preparation for and recovery from the storm.
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Entergy Nuclear personnel working in the corporate emergency center supporting the Waterford 3, River Bend and Grand Gulf nuclear energy facilities around-the-clock throughout Hurricane Isaac.

Entergy Nuclear personnel working in the corporate emergency center (Click to enlarge.)

The following news article originally appeared in NEI’s Nuclear Energy Overview.

Hurricane Isaac had no impact on the three Gulf Coast nuclear energy facilities, but operator Entergy made extensive preparations, including shutting down Waterford 3 before the storm made landfall Wednesday morning.

The National Weather Service downgraded Isaac to a tropical storm Wednesday night, and Entergy said it is preparing to return Waterford 3 to the grid.
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Nuclear energy facilities are built to withstand hurricanes and have a proven history of success.

With reactor containment structures of steel-reinforced concrete, nuclear energy facilities are some of the most robust in the U.S. infrastructure. Besides being built strong, nuclear plant operators train one out of every six weeks on how to safely manage extreme events, such as hurricanes, and regularly coordinate with local, state and federal officials to prepare for emergencies.

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Activity ID: 1002943 Activity Name: NEI Remarketing Safety Activity Group Name: Remarketing Safety First