FLEX

The following news article originally appeared in NEI’s Nuclear Energy Overview.

NEI has reiterated its position that the key to minimizing radioactive releases during an accident is to avoid core damage. In a letter to the NRC, NEI is also urging the agency to consolidate several issues it is analyzing separately.

NEI’s letter says the best approach to reduce the potential for land contamination is fundamentally by the numerous actions to prevent core damage already promulgated under the high-priority (Tier 1) recommendations issued by the NRC’s post-Fukushima task force.
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Industry/Regulatory/Political

  • A new study by the Electric Power Research Institute that examines options for minimizing the release of radioactive materials in a severe nuclear accident says that a combination of strategies would be much more effective than depending on any single measure. In particular, EPRI says that combining containment sprays or immersion of damaged fuel with a specifically designed vent that can reliably open and close at appropriate times would provide a more than 1,000-fold reduction in the amount of fission products released. Adding low-efficiency filters to vents can further reduce the release of fission product particles, although the report recommends further research to evaluate the efficacy of filter designs. EPRI acknowledges that “the best way to avoid radiological release and potential land contamination is to prevent an accident from occurring by improving and augmenting the strategies for preventing core damage,” a strategy in line with the industry’s “FLEX” approach.
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The following news article originally appeared in NEI’s Nuclear Energy Overview.

A new study by the Electric Power Research Institute that examines options for minimizing the release of radioactive materials in a severe nuclear accident says that a combination of strategies would be more effective than any single measure.The EPRI report looked at boiling water reactors with Mark I and Mark II containment designs, similar to those involved in the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi accident. The study notes that, while the accident did not have a long-term effect on public health and safety, it did result in “widespread contamination” of surrounding areas.
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The following news article originally appeared in NEI’s Nuclear Energy Overview.

The NRC has released Interim Staff Guidance on three post-Fukushima orders the agency issued in March on safety enhancements at the nation’s nuclear energy facilities.

“The NRC guidance issued last week meets the intent of the three orders issued earlier this year,” said Joe Pollock, NEI’s executive director of Fukushima response coordination and strategy. “We look forward to working with the NRC to effectively implement the guidance in the months and years ahead.”
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Below is a summary of actions by the U.S. nuclear energy industry in response to the accident at Fukushima Daiichi. These actions include proactive initiatives taken by the industry and a tailored, comprehensive industry response to new regulatory requirements.

Analyzing and Capturing Lessons Learned from Fukushima Daiichi and Fukushima Daini

  • The Institute of Nuclear Power Operations coordinated one of the most exhaustive timelines (INPO 11-005) of events at Fukushima Daiichi so that the U.S. and global industry can learn lessons from this event.

Read more on NEI’s main website >>

Activity ID: 1002943 Activity Name: NEI Remarketing Safety Activity Group Name: Remarketing Safety First