Emergency Preparedness

Nuclear energy facilities are built to withstand hurricanes and have a proven history of success.

With reactor containment structures of steel-reinforced concrete, nuclear energy facilities are some of the most robust in the U.S. infrastructure. Besides being built strong, nuclear plant operators train one out of every six weeks on how to safely manage extreme events, such as hurricanes, and regularly coordinate with local, state and federal officials to prepare for emergencies.

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Industry/Regulatory/Political

  • The International Atomic Energy Agency says its member nations have reported “significant progress” in nuclear safety in the past year, including assessments of safety vulnerabilities at nuclear energy facilities, emergency preparedness and response, and enhanced communications among member nations, international organizations and the public. The IAEA’s assessment comes in a progress report on the agency’s Action Plan on Nuclear Safety, which was unanimously endorsed last September as a follow-up to the Fukushima nuclear accident. The report will be presented at the organization’s annual General Conference in Vienna next month.
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The following news article originally appeared in NEI’s Nuclear Energy Overview.

The International Atomic Energy Agency says its member nations have reported “significant progress” in nuclear safety in the past year, including assessments of safety vulnerabilities at nuclear energy facilities, emergency preparedness and response, and enhanced communications among member nations, international organizations and the public.
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The following news article originally appeared in NEI’s Nuclear Energy Overview.

A new study from the National Academy of Sciences says that nuclear emergency preparedness drills helped an Iowa city cope with record-setting floods. The emergency drills may have saved lives, the report said.
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PSEG Nuclear's Jamie Mallon examines a back-up generator, one of several back-up systems that keep a plant running safely during an extended loss of power.

PSEG Nuclear's Fukushima Response Manager Jamie Mallon examines a back-up generator. (Click to enlarge.)

Top safety experts at all U.S.nuclear energy facilities are implementing FLEX, a strategy developed to address the main safety challenges at Fukushima, and planning for events that are more severe than those for which their facilities were designed. PSEG Nuclear’s Jamie Mallon is one such expert. With more than 30 years of experience in radiation protection, regulatory assurance, training and nuclear development programs, Mallon is helping to lead the industry’s Fukushima response effort, while balancing his roles as PSEG’s early site permit manager and Fukushima response manager. 

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Activity ID: 1002943 Activity Name: NEI Remarketing Safety Activity Group Name: Remarketing Safety First