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  • Safe/Secure

    Safe/Secure

    “Safety first” is not just our mantra—it’s our job, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Communities have the right to know the safety record of America’s nuclear energy plants. We are proud to share it. We are conducting a thorough assessment of the safety of each nuclear plant to ensure they are prepared for any event that could occur.

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  • Reliable

    Reliable

    One in five American homes and businesses is powered by electricity generated at the nation’s 104 nuclear energy facilities, which produce no greenhouse gases and which are the most reliable electricity generators. Nuclear energy technology is developed here at home, making it an important part of the nation’s comprehensive energy portfolio.

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  • Responsible

    Responsible

    “Here at home, nuclear power is an important part of our own energy future... Our nuclear power plants have undergone exhaustive study, and have been declared safe...But when we see a crisis like the one in Japan, we have a responsibility to learn from this event...” – President Barack Obama

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  • Vigilant

    Vigilant

    America’s nuclear energy facilities are built to a high safety standard, yet energy companies are actively reviewing their plants and procedures to ensure even more accountability. The U.S. nuclear industry embraces a simple principle: plan for the unexpected by integrating multi-layered safety features and operating procedures every step of the way.

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  • Japan: Latest Information
  • Safety and Security

The U.S. nuclear energy industry has created a joint leadership model to coordinate the industry's response to the events at the Fukushima Daiichi. The model will ensure that lessons learned are identified and well understood, and that response actions are effectively implemented industrywide.

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Following the Fukushima Daiichi accident, the U.S. nuclear energy industry began examining ways to ensure safety is maintained in the face of extreme natural events. The industry has begun implementing a number of measures to maintain and upgrade the already-high level of safety at nuclear energy facilities.

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Latest Information

Nearly a year after an earthquake and massive tsunami struck the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear energy facility in Japan, many U.S. experts still are in Japan assisting the recovery efforts.

The U.S. provided scores of radiation detectors and trained both the U.S. military and Japanese personnel on how to use them.

The U.S. provided scores of radiation detectors and trained both the U.S. military and Japanese personnel on how to use them.

U.S. organizations with expertise and capabilities in nuclear energy mobilized quickly and offered critical help in the aftermath of the natural disaster on March 11, 2011. While some lent equipment and expertise, others responded with humanitarian aid for residents left homeless by nature’s destruction.

Radiation specialists from the Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory were among the first people on the ground in Japan. Experts from the lab’s Radiological Assistance Program (RAP), who are on call to respond to any release of radiological materials in the United States, took hundreds of radiation readings and collected soil samples in the region around the stricken Japanese plant.

The data and samples they gathered will assist Japan’s recovery and provide a more detailed understanding of the radiological aspects of the accident. The U.S. provided scores of radiation detectors and trained both the U.S. military and Japanese personnel on how to use them.
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The following story originally appeared in NEI’s Nuclear Energy Overview.

Radiation health experts said at a Washington press briefing that based on the radiological data collected, the health effects of the Fukushima accident should be very minimal for both the public and workers.

“From a radiological perspective, we expect the impact to be really, really minor,” said Kathyrn Higley, professor of radiation health physics in the department of nuclear engineering at Oregon State University. “And the reason for that is we understand how radionuclides move through the environment, how they disperse and how people can be exposed. Because we understand that we are able to make decisions to block exposure.”
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The following story originally appeared in NEI’s Nuclear Energy Overview.

The nuclear energy industry is moving forward to implement its diverse and flexible emergency coping capability, or FLEX, with the goal of being “fully responsive” to the pending Nuclear Regulatory Commission order associated with mitigation strategies for beyond-design-basis external events, NEI said this week. The industry also plans to develop an alternative to performing probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of seismic hazards to ensure the work can be completed within the schedules defined in the proposed request for information.

“Of all the Tier 1 [post-Fukushima] recommendations, we believe the implementation of FLEX in response … offers the greatest safety enhancement in the shortest timeframe,” NEI Senior Vice President and Chief Nuclear Officer Anthony Pietrangelo said in Feb. 28 comments on the NRC’s proposed post-Fukushima actions (SECY-12-0025).
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Making Safe Nuclear Energy SaferWith the anniversary of the incident at Fukushima Daiichi almost upon us, it’s only natural for the public and other stakeholders to ask questions about the safety of America’s nuclear energy facilities. To answer those questions, NEI has published a white paper entitled, “Making Safe Nuclear Energy Safer.”

The following passage is from the document’s Executive Summary:

The nuclear energy industry’s primary and constant goal is to make safe nuclear energy facilities even safer. A decades-long commitment to safety and continuous learning is reflected in the operational focus and safety culture at our facilities. Companies that operate 104 U.S. reactors review safety procedures continually and update their facilities and training programs with lessons learned from those reviews.
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Dr. Robert Emery, vice president for safety, health, environment and risk management at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center at Houston, talks about the role of the radiation protection community played in the wake of the incident at Fukushima Daiichi.


Visit NEI’s YouTube channel to see part II and part III to the video.

Activity ID: 1002943 Activity Name: NEI Remarketing Safety Activity Group Name: Remarketing Safety First