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  • Safe/Secure

    Safe/Secure

    “Safety first” is not just our mantra—it’s our job, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Communities have the right to know the safety record of America’s nuclear energy plants. We are proud to share it. We are conducting a thorough assessment of the safety of each nuclear plant to ensure they are prepared for any event that could occur.

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  • Reliable

    Reliable

    One in five American homes and businesses is powered by electricity generated at the nation’s 104 nuclear energy facilities, which produce no greenhouse gases and which are the most reliable electricity generators. Nuclear energy technology is developed here at home, making it an important part of the nation’s comprehensive energy portfolio.

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  • Responsible

    Responsible

    “Here at home, nuclear power is an important part of our own energy future... Our nuclear power plants have undergone exhaustive study, and have been declared safe...But when we see a crisis like the one in Japan, we have a responsibility to learn from this event...” – President Barack Obama

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  • Vigilant

    Vigilant

    America’s nuclear energy facilities are built to a high safety standard, yet energy companies are actively reviewing their plants and procedures to ensure even more accountability. The U.S. nuclear industry embraces a simple principle: plan for the unexpected by integrating multi-layered safety features and operating procedures every step of the way.

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  • Japan: Latest Information
  • Safety and Security

The U.S. nuclear energy industry has created a joint leadership model to coordinate the industry's response to the events at the Fukushima Daiichi. The model will ensure that lessons learned are identified and well understood, and that response actions are effectively implemented industrywide.

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Following the Fukushima Daiichi accident, the U.S. nuclear energy industry began examining ways to ensure safety is maintained in the face of extreme natural events. The industry has begun implementing a number of measures to maintain and upgrade the already-high level of safety at nuclear energy facilities.

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Latest Information

The following story originally appeared in NEI’s Nuclear Energy Overview.

Use of nuclear energy will continue “to play a full part in the future energy mix” despite the accident in Japan, a new report says.

The report, by the World Energy Council, notes that the growth of nuclear energy is mainly being driven by non-OECD countries, “the very countries that are seeing ever rising energy demand.” These countries account for 39 of the 63 nuclear plants being built worldwide.

Very little has changed, especially in non-OECD countries, in respect of the future utilization of nuclear in the energy mix,” the report says.
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Industry/Regulatory/Political

  • Japan’s Nuclear Safety Commission said last week that Kansai Electric Power Co.’s Ohi reactors 3 and 4 are safe to restart. The commissioners and a team of outside experts agreed with the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency that KEPCO’s stress test results for the reactors are satisfactory. Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda and three cabinet ministers will use the NSC recommendation to decide on restarting the facilities. Under agreements made by utilities, local governments also have approval rights to restart the reactors. NISA is evaluating the results of stress tests for 16 other reactors.
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Southern Nuclear's SAM Program Director David Gambrell

Southern Nuclear's SAM Program Director David Gambrell

David Gambrell serves as director of Southern Nuclear’s Severe Accident Management (SAM) team — a group formed in July 2011 to help influence regulations in response to the event at Fukushima and other natural external hazard events in the United States. The mission of this team is to prepare Southern Nuclear’s fleet for anticipated changes in facilities, procedures and processes.

Gambrell shares his take on the current state of the industry and the action Southern Nuclear has taken as a result.

What has happened in this country since Fukushima?

After March 11, 2011, the United States immediately began to examine our own procedures and designs to determine where improvements can be made to keep our plants safe during natural events.
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Operators of nuclear energy facilities in the United States have begun taking actions to enhance safety at the nation’s 104 nuclear reactors, applying lessons learned from the Fukushima facility in Japan. These actions, which include acquiring additional safety equipment to ensure that every U.S. nuclear energy facility can respond safely to extreme events, are part of the industry’s “diverse and flexible, “ or FLEX response strategy. The articles below highlight progress already underway.

Indian Point invests in training, backups to guard spent fuel pools
The Journal News/LoHud.com
March 10, 2012

“Indian Point has invested about $1 million in pumps, backup diesel generators, specialized training and other safety measures in the year since an earthquake and tsunami tore through a Japanese nuclear plant. … At Indian Point, which has applied to extend its operating license through 2035 rather than be shut down in the next few years, new high-powered portable pumps in truck-size containers are staged near containment buildings. The idea for these came out of post-9/11 reviews, so workers could respond more quickly to a plane hitting a reactor containment dome.”
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The following story originally appeared in NEI’s Nuclear Energy Overview.

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued orders to operators of nuclear energy facilities requiring enhanced protection of portable emergency equipment, hardened containment vents for some reactors and additional instrumentation for monitoring the water level in used fuel pools. In approving the orders, the commission agreed with the staff that the modifications outlined are sufficiently important to safety that the implementation cost need not be considered.
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Activity ID: 1002943 Activity Name: NEI Remarketing Safety Activity Group Name: Remarketing Safety First