1 2 3 4
  • Safe/Secure

    Safe/Secure

    “Safety first” is not just our mantra—it’s our job, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Communities have the right to know the safety record of America’s nuclear energy plants. We are proud to share it. We are conducting a thorough assessment of the safety of each nuclear plant to ensure they are prepared for any event that could occur.

    Read More >>

  • Reliable

    Reliable

    One in five American homes and businesses is powered by electricity generated at the nation’s 104 nuclear energy facilities, which produce no greenhouse gases and which are the most reliable electricity generators. Nuclear energy technology is developed here at home, making it an important part of the nation’s comprehensive energy portfolio.

    Read More >>

  • Responsible

    Responsible

    “Here at home, nuclear power is an important part of our own energy future... Our nuclear power plants have undergone exhaustive study, and have been declared safe...But when we see a crisis like the one in Japan, we have a responsibility to learn from this event...” – President Barack Obama

    Read More >>

  • Vigilant

    Vigilant

    America’s nuclear energy facilities are built to a high safety standard, yet energy companies are actively reviewing their plants and procedures to ensure even more accountability. The U.S. nuclear industry embraces a simple principle: plan for the unexpected by integrating multi-layered safety features and operating procedures every step of the way.

    Read More >>

  • Japan: Latest Information
  • Safety and Security

The U.S. nuclear energy industry has created a joint leadership model to coordinate the industry's response to the events at the Fukushima Daiichi. The model will ensure that lessons learned are identified and well understood, and that response actions are effectively implemented industrywide.

MORE »

Following the Fukushima Daiichi accident, the U.S. nuclear energy industry began examining ways to ensure safety is maintained in the face of extreme natural events. The industry has begun implementing a number of measures to maintain and upgrade the already-high level of safety at nuclear energy facilities.

MORE »

Latest Information

The following story originally appeared in NEI’s Nuclear Energy Overview.

The United States and Japan are forming a bilateral commission to foster “comprehensive strategic dialogue and joint activities” on nuclear safety and cleanup as a follow-up to last year’s nuclear accident in at Fukushima Daiichi.

President Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda announced plans this week for the Bilateral Commission on Civil Nuclear Cooperation, which will coordinate research and development in nuclear safety, security, environmental management and nonproliferation. The establishment of the commission builds on an agreement the two nations reached in March.
Read More »

The following story originally appeared in NEI’s Nuclear Energy Overview.

A peer review by European nuclear regulators of the “stress tests” performed on 147 nuclear energy facilities in the European Union has found that most countries’ operators have identified and taken “significant steps” to improve plant safety in the wake of the Fukushima Daiichi accident of March 2011.
Read More »

Industry/Regulatory/Political

  • Japanese central government officials met last week with more than 550 people living near the Ohi nuclear energy facility to make the case that two of the four reactors are safe to restart. The mayor of Ohi said the town council would decide whether to approve the restart now that it has heard from the public. If the Ohi reactors are brought back online, they will be the first to resume operations since the March 11, 2011, earthquake and tsunami. Meanwhile, Hokkaido Electric Power Co.’s Tomari 3, Japan’s last operating commercial nuclear reactor, will shut down for regular inspections this weekend. Last week, TEPCO officially removed the four damaged Fukushima Daiichi reactors from its roster, leaving Japan with 50 operable commercial units.
    Read More »
Packbot enters Fukushima Daiichi unit 3's reactor building for the first time since the accident.

Packbot enters Fukushima Daiichi unit 3's reactor building for the first time since the accident. (Click to enlarge.)

When many of us think of robots, images of Wall-E, Optimus Prime, R2-D2 and other droids from our favorite science-fiction movies come to mind. However, robots have many critical real-life functions, including detecting bombs in war zones and assisting in recovery efforts at disaster areas. More recently, robots have been utilized to clean up the reactors at Tokyo Electric Power Company’s (TEPCO) Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. These remotely-controlled vehicles have removed debris from the site and measured radioactivity in hazardous zones, all while transmitting video and information back to workers who monitor the data from a safe distance. The robots are master scouts, mapping radiation and taking samples to ensure that conditions are safe for their human colleagues.
Read More »

The following story originally appeared in NEI’s Nuclear Energy Overview.

A new report by the Geneva-based World Economic Forum warns that Japan could put its energy security at risk if it turns its back on nuclear energy.

A case study on Japan in the report “New Energy Architecture: Enabling an Effective Transition” notes that since the Fukushima accident there has been an “unprecedented level of debate and stakeholder engagement” in Japan about the country’s energy future.
Read More »

Activity ID: 1002943 Activity Name: NEI Remarketing Safety Activity Group Name: Remarketing Safety First