December 2011

Fukushima Daini Workers Laying Cables

TEPCO Workers Lay Cables to Restore Power to Fukushima Daini

Struggling against earthquake aftershocks, devastating floodwaters and debris, employees at Tokyo Electric Power Co.’s (TEPCO) Fukushima Daini nuclear energy facility safely shut down all four of the facility’s reactors within days of the historic 9.0-magnitude earthquake and tsunami that struck on March 11. The facility is located only seven miles southwest of its sister plant, Fukushima Daiichi, and produces enough electricity to power roughly three million homes and businesses in Japan.

When the earthquake struck, the Fukushima Daini facility automatically shut down safely as designed. However, it went into a state of emergency following the tsunami when water damage disrupted heat removal systems in three of the four reactors.

TEPCO reactor operators were able to quickly bring reactor 3, which had retained its heat removal function, into stable condition in a matter of hours. Meanwhile, other employees worked feverishly around-the-clock to reestablish heat removal capability in the other three reactors and finished stabilizing them by March 15.
Read More »

Industry/Regulatory/Political

  • Government health checks of some 1,700 residents who were evacuated from three municipalities after the Fukushima Daiichi accident show that two-thirds received an external radiation dose within the government limit of 100 millirem per year, according to an NHK World report. It added that 98 percent of those tested showed an estimated dose of less than 500 millirem. Authorities said about 10 members of the public were exposed to more than 1,000 millirem. (For comparison, the average annual dose to members of the U.S. public from natural and manmade radiation sources is about 400 millirem.) Read More »

Industry/Regulatory/Political

  • Tokyo Electric Power Co., operator of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear energy facility, said about 40 gallons of water containing radioactive strontium drained into the ocean following a leak in desalination equipment. TEPCO said it is likely to have little effect on the environment.
    Read More »
Dominion Employee Inspecting Safety Systems Following Earthquake Near North Anna Power Station

Dominion Employee Inspecting Safety Systems Following Earthquake Near North Anna Power Station

Every nuclear energy facility in the United States is built with layer upon layer of safety systems. So, when a rare 5.8-magnitude earthquake shook the East Coast on August 23, this built-in margin of safety ensured that all 14 nuclear energy facilities from North Carolina to Michigan that were impacted by the quake safely withstood nature’s challenge.

Dominion’s North Anna Power Station in central Virginia, located just 11 miles from the epicenter of the quake, felt the most impact. Shortly after the earthquake began, North Anna’s two 1,800-megawatt reactors shut down safely and automatically as designed. Four locomotive-sized diesel generators activated to keep the facility’s safety systems running when power was lost.

“A 5.8-magnitude earthquake is highly unusual for the region,” said Eugene S. Grecheck, vice president of nuclear development at Dominion, “but the energy that was imparted to the plant by the quake was relatively minor. In fact, a detailed evaluation of the duration and energy of the August 23 event shows that it was actually less than one-third as strong as for which the facility was built.”
Read More »

Plant Status

  • Tokyo Electric Power Co. has begun injecting nitrogen into the pressure vessels of Fukushima Daiichi reactors 1 through 3. The action will reduce any buildup of hydrogen in the reactors as TEPCO prepares to announce, as early as next week, its achievement of what the company calls a “cold shutdown condition.” A new “Ask the Expert” post explains how and why TEPCO’s definition of the term differs from common industry usage.
    Read More »
Activity ID: 1002943 Activity Name: NEI Remarketing Safety Activity Group Name: Remarketing Safety First